Guide to Conservation by WWF

Guide to Conservation by WWF

According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, aquaculture makes up almost half (73 million tons) of the world supply of seafood (150 million tons). By some estimates, aquaculture is projected to surpass wild harvest in fisheries production and supply in the next 10 years. Since aquaculture is emerging as a competitive alternative to the fishing industry, revenue from aquaculture production could be a substantial source of funding for conservation activities, as illustrated by these examples from Honduras, Ecuador, and Australia. www.fao.org/docrep/009/a0699e/A0699E00.HTM

Read the full report here. Our farms are featured on page 28.

“To date, revenues from fish sales are $2,400,000, of which $514,000 in profits are being reinvested in community projects”

Regal Springs Tilapia is one of the largest producers of tilapia in the world. The company invests in conservation and social projects with communities in Honduras, Indonesia and Mexico. In Honduras, one of the company’s projects, “Fish for Trees,” provides community members with the opportunity to start their own tilapia aquafarms by giving them a percentage the company’s fingerlings, feed, and tilapia cages. The profits from this project go back into community projects, such as planting trees to pre- vent soil erosion, installing electricity to reduce the use of wood for cooking, policing the forest against illegal logging, supporting health clinics, and investing in con- servation education. To date, revenues from fish sales are $2,400,000, of which $514,000 in profits are being reinvested in community projects. Regal Springs has also invested $150,000 per year of their own money in additional community and conservation projects. Their approach to fish farming and conservation are to incorporate a [sic] holistic strategy of sustainable business profits, education, environmental protection, and community infrastructure development.